Thursday, February 22, 2018

U.S. House Natural Resources Subcommittee Holds Hearing on Important Conservation Bills

February 16, 2018 (Washington, DC) - The House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Federal Lands held a hearing yesterday on the Recovering America's Wildlife Act (H.R. 4647), among other important bills for fish, wildlife, and land conservation.

Recovering America's Wildlife Act was introduced on December 14, 2017 in bipartisan fashion by Congressional Sportsmen's Caucus Members (CSC) Congressman Jeff Fortenberry (NE) and Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (MI) to provide adequate funding for the nearly 12,000 species identified as at-risk by state fish and wildlife agencies in their State Wildlife Action Plans. Specifically, this legislation would dedicate $1.3 billion annually in existing funding from the royalties and fees collected from offshore and onshore energy and mineral development on federal lands and waters towards state-based fish and wildlife conservation efforts. 

"Our nation's fish and wildlife are some of our most valuable resources, supporting jobs, our economy and providing countless hours of outdoor enjoyment," said Congresswoman Dingell. "I am proud to work with Congressman Fortenberry on the Recovering America's Wildlife Act, which compliments landmark conservation programs already in place to help protect at-risk species before it is too late. The approaches in this bill are proven and some of the best ways to restore and create new habitat, and ensure future generations can enjoy our rich outdoor heritage. I am pleased to see the Natural Resources Committee move this important legislation forward today and will continue working with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to get it across the finish line."

In addition to H.R. 4647, the Committee discussed the Modernizing the Pittman-Robertson Fund for Tomorrow's Needs of 2017 (H.R. 2591), introduced by CSC Vice-Chair Congressman Austin Scott (GA). This bipartisan bill, supported by CSC leadership, would clarify that one of the purposes of the Pittman-Robertson Fund is to extend and provide technical and financial assistance to the states for hunter recruitment and retention efforts.

Bob Ziehmer, the Senior Director of Conservation for Bass Pro Shops, testified in support of H.R. 4647 and H.R. 2591. Ziehmer, who previously served as the Director of the Missouri Department of Conservation, is a member of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Sustaining America's Diverse Fish and Wildlife Resources, along with Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation (CSF) President Jeff Crane. The panel recommended the funding approach that is addressed in Recovering America's Wildlife Act.

CSF applauds House Chairman Rob Bishop, Chairman Tom McClintock, and the House Natural Resources Committee Members for their leadership in advancing pro-sportsmen legislation in the 115th Congress. 

Informational Meetings for Proposed Updates to Wisconsin's Wetland Indicator Layer

The first step land owners, developers and builders need to take before picking up a shovel or calling in the bulldozers is determining whether a proposed project site is located within a wetland. A new upgrade to the Department of Natural Resource’s interactive wetland indicator map found at will make it easier to determine if a project has the potential to impact wetlands.
“The advantage of this new upgrade is to target potential wetlands on a land owner’s property to avoid any inadvertent wetlands disturbance during development and avoid unnecessary wetland delineation costs,” says Amanda Minks, DNR Waterway and Wetland Policy Coordinator.
Minks said the DNR has been working with the National Resource Conservation Service to integrate updated soil information, field reporting and digital topography tools to its current map, which is referred to as the pink layer, so that the agency can provide users with the most comprehensive tool possible.
If wetland impacts are possible, state law requires a wetland delineation to confirm wetland impacts and determine the amount of the potential impact. The newly upgraded tool will allow users to target areas at a more refined scale, which can help avoid or minimize wetland impacts and determine the appropriate regulatory process for projects.
To preview the updated system to potential users, the department is hosting two hour-long informational meetings on Tuesday, March 6, 2018, 10:00 a.m., at the Green Bay Service Center, and Friday, March 9, 2018, 2 p.m., in room G09 at the DNR Central Office, 101 S. Webster, in Madison.
“We want to give our potential users an opportunity to experience the changes before we release the final upgrade to the public in late spring this year so they will better understand the changes and how to use the layer,” Minks said.

Anyone interested in learning more about wetland indicators can visit the DNR’s website ( to read more about recognizing indicators and view informational videos about the steps toward ensuring building projects start off on the right track.   Questions or comments can also be emailed directly to Amanda Minks at

Friday, February 16, 2018

Making Waves: Battle for the Great Lakes Film Screening and Talk

February 15, 2018

By Tim Campbell and Marie Zhuikov

Join Tim Campbell, aquatic invasive species outreach specialist for UW-Extension and Wisconsin Sea Grant, for a free screening of the two-hour documentary, “Making Waves: Battle for the Great Lakes,” followed by a short question-and-answer session. The screening will take place at 6:30-9:30 p.m. on Friday, March 9, at the Lake Superior Estuarium on Barker’s Island in Superior (3 Marina Drive).

The film takes viewers below the surface of the world’s largest freshwater ecosystem, and into the middle of a complex web of interactions and changes. For over a century, non-native plants, fish and invertebrates have been silently invading the Great Lakes and are transforming the ecosystem from top to bottom, threatening ecological diversity and local economies.
Making Waves chronicles the path of this invasion to the present day. The filmmakers join researchers on the front lines as they work to understand invasive species and to restore native species in an effort to prevent a biological takeover of the Great Lakes.

The screening is sponsored by the Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve.


Bloody Red ShrimpMADISON, Wisc.—A single specimen of the bloody red shrimp (Hemimysis anomala) has been detected in the Lower St. Louis River near Allouez Bay, Wisconsin, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announced today.  Sweep net samples were processed and taxonomic identification completed by Service staff and Badger Technical Services in January 2018.[WRS-D1]  This is the first detection of the species in Lake Superior, which was collected as part of annual sampling done by the Service.

“While the collection of a single individual shrimp suggests this species is not abundant or widespread, it’s a disappointing detection.  While the impacts on other Great Lakes are currently unknown, we still want to be cautious about how we approach the management of this species,” said Jeremy Bates, Early Detection and Rapid Response Coordinator with the WDNR. 
Bloody red shrimp was first reported in 2006 in Lake Ontario and Lake Michigan, and is already documented in all other Great Lakes.  The species, like other invasive species, are known to reproduce and spread, ultimately degrading habitat, out-competing native species and short-circuiting food webs.
“Early detection is crucial to effectively managing invasive animals before they gain a foothold in the environment,” said Amy McGovern, Midwest Aquatic Nuisance Species Coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “The discovery of a bloody red shrimp in Lake Superior is a testament to the ongoing importance of the Great Lakes Early Detection and Monitoring Program.”
The Service will continue targeted sampling for bloody red shrimp and other annual AIS sampling throughout the Great Lakes as part of the Great Lakes Early Detection and Monitoring Program. 
Boaters and anglers in Wisconsin are asked to do their part to make sure aquatic invasive species (AIS) don’t move to inland waters by taking the following preventive measures:

  • Inspect and thoroughly clean equipment and clothing
  • Remove aquatic plants and debris from boats and equipment
  • Drain water from live wells and bilge compartments before leaving the waterway
  • Transport your catch on ice

Friday, February 9, 2018

Public meetings set for mid-February and early March to update sturgeon management plan

OSHKOSH, Wis. - Wisconsin's oldest fish species - lake sturgeon present when dinosaurs roamed the earth - is set for an updated management plan. Sturgeon lovers can help shape that plan by attending one of eight public meetings statewide in mid-February and early-March.

"Wisconsin's sturgeon team is in the early stages of a process to update the sturgeon management plan and we want to hear from anglers and others interested in sturgeon," says Ryan Koenigs, the sturgeon biologist who leads the Department of Natural Resources sturgeon team. "These meetings provide people an opportunity to comment on the state's sturgeon management program and will set the stage for development of the plan."

Sturgeon facts and history

Lake sturgeon are currently managed under guidance from the 2000 Lake Sturgeon Management Plan. An updated plan will allow DNR staff and partners to continue to build on the previous plan's success, set new goals, and include management strategies for both lake sturgeon and shovelnose sturgeon management. It is important to note that the previous plan did not include shovelnose sturgeon.

Public meeting dates, locations and starting times are listed below:

• Tuesday, Feb. 20 - Eau Claire, 6:30 p.m., DNR Eau Claire Service Center, 1300 W. Clairemont Ave.;
• Tuesday, Feb. 20 - Fitchburg, 6:30 p.m., DNR Fitchburg Service Center, 3911 Fish Hatchery Road;
• Tuesday, Feb. 20 - Webster, 6:30 p.m., Larsen Family Public Library, 7401 W. Main St.;
• Wednesday, Feb. 21 - La Crosse, 6:30 p.m. DNR La Crosse Service Center, 3550 Mormon Coulee Road;
• Wednesday, Feb. 21 - Oshkosh, 6:30 p.m., Coughlin Building, Conference rooms A and B, 625 E County Road Y;
• Wednesday, Feb. 21 - Park Falls, 6 p.m. Public Library, 410 Division St.;
• Tuesday, March 6 - Ashland, 6 p.m. Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College, 2100 Beaser Ave.; and
• Tuesday, March 6 - Oconto, 6 p.m., Oconto City Hall, 1210 Main St.

There also will be future opportunities for people to comment online, and materials prepared for the meetings will be posted online as they become available.

Wisconsin has long been regarded as a national and international leader in sturgeon protection, restoration and research - a reputation built since DNR began regulating sturgeon harvest on the Winnebago system in 1903.

Wisconsin offers a hook-and-line season on multiple major rivers with healthy, growing populations and boasts the world's largest self-sustaining population of lake sturgeon. In locations where sturgeon populations are not as strong, DNR and partners are working to rebuild sturgeon populations.

For more information regarding sturgeon management, visit and search keyword "sturgeon."